The HiddenCures Beck Blood Electrifier

Beck Blood Electrifier

This unit is no longer available (but parts and service are available).  This information is maintained for prior customers.  Search the internet for alternatives.

Manufactured by Sota, the first to manufacture Beck's units and endorsed by Dr. Beck, the Silver Pulser is a combination blood electrifier / colloidal silver maker.

Contents on this page:
Warning
Description
Description of Controls and Lamps
How to Use the Blood Electrifier
How to Make Colloidal Silver
Technical Description: The Blood Electrifier
Technical Description: The Colloidal Silver Maker
Battery Replacement
Testing of the Unit
Technical Specifications

Warning
Prior units were manufactured with a third frequency of 0.4 Hz. The inventer of this frequency has issued a warning not to use it.


Description

The HiddenCures unit is a combination blood electrifier and colloidal silver maker. It uses three 9-volt batteries and is housed in an attractive 5" x 2-3/4" x 1-1/4" plastic box. It is light weight (12 oz.) and can fit into your pocket. Switches provide selection of two frequencies, 4Hz, and 100 Hz, and selection of either square wave or modified square wave. It has an output level control, and a current monitor light that indicates when at least 150 microamps is flowing through the electrodes; this insures a sufficient current to do the job. The stainless-steel electrodes plug into the output jack via 4-1/2 feet of wire. A test switch and lamp allow for confirmation of proper functioning and battery life. The unit incorporates a microcomputer in order to make superior colloidal silver. And a smart-pilot lamp reminds you the unit is on so you don't run down the batteries. For ease of making colloidal silver, silver wires plug into the bottom of the unit, and the unit sits on top of the glass of 8-ounces of distilled water. The process is automatic and the unit stops when about 5ppm of colloid is made.

The unit is supplied with batteries, stainless-steel probes attached to 4-1/2 feet of cable, and two pieces of four inch long .040" diameter silver wire (99.99% fine). Brief instructions are included, which should not replace research on the net.
return to top of page

Description of Controls and LampsBeck Blood Electrifier Front Panel

Off/On Switch Turns the unit on and off. When the button is in, the unit is on.

4Hz/100 Switch Selects between, 4Hz and 100Hz. Push the button in for 100Hz; out for 4Hz. Hz is an abbreviation for Hertz, which stands for "cycles per second." 4Hz is the standard frequency employed by conventional Beck units. Why you would use another frequency is explained below.

Sqr/Mod Switch Selects between standard square wave output, and modified square wave output in which the leading and trailing edges of the square wave are rounded. A rounded wave is more comfortable, but generally not as effective. Why you would use one or the other is explained below.

Test Switch Used to test the functioning of the unit. When the switch is pressed, the test lamp should light. Note that the lamp will display differently depending on the positions of the 4Hz/100 and Sqr/Mod switches; when these switches are out, the lamp will alternately flash red and green at 8 times per second. When the batteries run low, the lamp will become dim. When the batteries are dead, the lamp will not flash at all so it is time to replace the batteries. Note that the colloidal silver maker may not work properly if you use the unit past the dead battery point, even though the Ag lamp flashes properly.

Test Lamp Used to test the functioning of the unit. See Test Switch.

150uA Lamp Whenever current in the electrodes exceeds 150 uA (micro Amps), this lamp will flash (if the 4Hz/100 switch is out) or remain lit (4Hz/100 switch is in). The lamp will be dim in order to conserve batteries. This lamp insures that a sufficient level of current is being used, rather than guessing.

Ag Lamp When making colloidal silver (chemical symbol for silver is Ag), this lamp flashes at a rate proportional to current flow. Maximum rate is about 3 times per second. When not making colloidal silver, this lamp doubles as a pilot light and flashes for a quarter second every 2 seconds; if it doesn't, this indicates a problem with the microcomputer (or dead batteries). No more running down the batteries because you didn't know the unit was on! Do not use this lamp as a low-battery indicator; use the Test Switch and Test Lamp for that.

Level Control Used to adjust the output level to the electrodes.
return to top of page

How to Use the Blood Electrifier
To avoid shock hazard, do not use battery eliminators or line operated supplies.

Please do not email me and ask question regarding electromedicine. I have never studied electromedicine, and I do not give medical advice. I'm an electronics engineer and manufacturer. So don't ask me about electromedicine because all I'll do is refer you to the materials listed below:
As you read his articles, note that Dr. Beck's recommendations change from time to time. Note: To make yourself a user manual (since none is provided), copy and print out the information from this page, and the information from the following links.

For basic information:

Other related sites:
http://www.padrak.com/beck/

return to top of page

How to Make Colloidal Silver
Heat 8-ounces of distilled water (not reverse-osmosis) until it is more than warm but not hot or steamy, and pour it into a clean cup; a standard 8-oz measuring cup will do fine. Heating the water will speed up the process and also make a better quality colloid. Since distilled water does not conduct very well, some manufacturers suggest adding salt to the water to get the process going. This is not recommended since the silver might react with the salt to make silver chloride or other salts. The microcomputer will make a fairly consistent batch each time, whatever temperature you use (see the technical description).

Notice that there are two small holes on the bottom the the unit. Wash the silver wires the first time before use, dry them (don't get water into the unit!), and plug them into the holes as far as they will go; be gentle, you may have to wiggle them to start, do not force them. Place the unit over the cup of 8-ounces of distilled water with the silver wires in the water. Be sure that the silver wires do not touch each other (if they touch, no harm is done, but no colloid will be made). They should be somewhat evenly spaced. Turn the unit on; the Ag lamp will flash at a rate proportional to the electrical current entering the silver wire, but no more than about 3 times per second. After about 7 minutes, the Ag lamp will stop flashing and stay on solid, indicating the colloid is done. No more current will be put into the water (actually, the current drops to 1%). If the water is cold, it could take a lot longer than 7 minutes. Turn the unit off to reset the unit.

After each use, the wires will turn somewhat black. Wipe this off with a paper towel; you can also use a plastic scouring pad. ALWAYS PLUG THE SHINY CLEAN END OF THE SILVER WIRE INTO THE UNIT. You don't want black residue to degrade the quality of the electrical contacts.

Note: If the conductivity is too low (as with cold water, or if the wires are not inserted into water), the microcomputer will sense this, and after 10 seconds the Ag lamp will take on the roll of a pilot lamp, flashing for 1/4 second every 2 seconds. Proper current measurement is done regardless of the role the Ag lamp takes. More batteries are run down because of units accidentally left on, than from drain of the pilot lamp (which is only on for a short time). If the conductivity of the water increases (which it will do as the process proceeds), the lamp will begin to flash as expected.

Every time you turn the unit on, you reset the microcomputer; this is indicated by a solid flash of the Ag lamp before normal flashing begins. It starts the colloidal silver making cycle over from the beginning.

Do not use sterling silver wire which contains nickel. Store the colloidal silver in hydrogen peroxide bottles or brown glass bottles, and in the dark; silver colloids are degraded by light and turn gray or black. Make and store silver colloid only in electrically nonconductive containers such as glass, never in metal. Stir or shake before use. For daily use, the Fall 1995 issue of FOCUS by Allergy Research Group recommended dosages in the range of 3 teaspoons to 3 tablespoons per day. To "knock" something out, you may want to use a lot more, perhaps one cup per day, for a few days.

For a good article on colloidal silver, see: http://www.elixa.com/silver/lindmn.htm.

return to top of page

Technical Description: The Blood Electrifier
The blood electrifier is a frequency generator capable of generating 4 Hz or 100 Hz output at a nominal maximum of 26 volts at 26 milliamps. The waveform can be either square, or modified square in which the leading and trailing edges are rounded. Output level is controlled by a 100K potentiometer used in rheostat mode (i.e., in series with the output). Output current in excess of 150uA will turn on an LED.
return to top of page

Technical Description: The Colloidal Silver Maker
There are various approaches to making colloidal silver. The simplest versions consist of a 27 volt source (3 X 9-Volt batteries) in series with a lamp (or resistor). Others use a constant current source. Some use a constant voltage source (constant 30 volts even if the battery runs down). The problem is that the conductivity of the water changes with temperature and also with parts per million (PPM) of minerals in the water; it's hard to make a consistent batch each time because you don't know when the batch is done.

Rather than use constant voltage or constant current, the approach taken here is to use a constant charge (= current x time) to make fairly consistent batches. 4 milliamps (mA) for 10 minutes has the same charge as 2 milliamps for 20 minutes. The circuit consists of a 4.6mA current source coupled to an integrator which will provide a constant 2 coulomb (charge) to the water. Once a predetermined charge is put into the water, the unit stops (turns off), and the Ag lamp (Ag is the chemical symbol for Silver) stops blinking and turns on solid.

From the same bottle of distilled water, I ran one 8-ounce batch at room temperature, and another batch with hot water. At room temperature, the batch took 16 minutes and produced 4 PPM of colloidal silver. With hot water, the batch took 7 minutes (the fastest possible) and produced 8 PPM of colloidal silver. For a given charge, more colloid is produced at a higher temperature. Still, 4 or 8 PPM is within a nominal ballpark, which is much more certain than other approaches which require a PPM tester to know what you are getting. This is automated and very convenient.

Note: PPM measurements were taken using a Hanna Instruments DiST WP1 Dissolved Solids Tester. http://www.hannainst.com.
return to top of page

Battery Replacement
To replace the batteries, be sure the unit is turned off. Remove the four bottom screws by turning counter clockwise with a #0 Philips screwdriver, and carefully lift off the top cover. Note how the batteries are positioned. The batteries can now be unsnapped and replaced. When replacing the screws, tighten only as necessary to secure the cover to the box; do not over tighten
return to top of page

Testing of the Unit
There are several tests to confirm proper operation:
Turn the unit on.
1) The Ag lamp should act as a pilot lamp, flashing for 1/4 second every 2 seconds. This confirms that the microcomputer is running.

2) Test of batteries and output stage: Be sure the 4Hz/100 and Sqr/Mod switches are out. Press the test button. The Test lamp should change from red to green 8 times per second, equal duration of each color. When the batteries drop to about 20 volts, the Test lamp will become dim and go out. Replace all three batteries. Do not rely on the Ag lamp for low-battery sensing.

3) Test of Sqr/Mod switch: With this switch on, the Test lamp will have a "soft" response.

4) Test of 4Hz/100 switch: With this switch on, the Test lamp will appear solid on, both red and green simultaneously on.

5) To test the output cable and current monitor circuit, plug the cable into the jack and touch ("short") the stainless-steel output electrodes together (remove the cotton socks). The 150uA Lamp should blink 4 times per second. If it does not, either the cable or the circuit is defective.

With the electrodes shorted together, the output stage can now be tested by pressing the Test button and turning the output level control clockwise. The Test lamp will dim to half when the level control reaches the end of it's range.

6) To test the colloidal silver maker (and microcomputer), gently plug the silver wires into the bottom socket holes, and touch the wires together. The Ag lamp should flash at about 3 times per second.

If you are inclined, you can continue with the following tests:

If you release the wires, the lamp should stop flashing; after 10 seconds, the lamp should blink for 1/4 second every 2 seconds (pilot light mode).If you touch the wires together for 7 minutes, the Ag lamp should stop blinking and turn solid on.

If you connect a milliampmeter across the silver wires (no longer shorted together), you should measure about 4.6mA (this is a current source). After 7 minutes, the current should drop to about 50 uA.
return to top of page

Technical Specifications

Power supply: 27 volts (3 x 9-volt batteries)
Weight: 5-1/2 ounces; 12 ounces with batteries.
Dimensions: 5" x 2-3/4" x 1-1/4"

Blood Electrifier
Maximum output voltage: 26 V
Maximum output current: 26 mA
Output level control: 100 K ohm series potentiometer
Nominal output frequency: 4 Hz, or 100 Hz, selectable
Output waveform: Square or rounded edges ("modified"), selectable
Output current monitor: LED flashes at 150 uA

Colloidal Silver Maker
Maximum output voltage: 26 V
Maximum output current: 4.6 mA (current source)
Charge delivered to output before stop: 2 Coulombs (=amps x seconds)
Ag lamp blink rate: 3 Hz/4 mA (.75 Hz/mA) nominal
Ag lamp - number of flashes till stop: 1420